Department of Electronics Undergraduate FAQ

This page contains answers to a number of frequently asked questions about the undergraduate Electrical Engineering and Engineering Physics programs.

Should you not find the answer to your question then please contact the associate chair (undergraduate) for the Dept. of Electronics.

General

The associate chair (undergraduate) for the Dept. of Electronics can provide advice about the programs in Electrical Engineering and Engineering Physics, as well as advice on ELEC courses.

The associate chair (undergraduate) for the Dept. of Systems and Computer Engineering can provide advice about the programs in Biomedical and Electrical Engineering, Communications, Computer Systems and Software Engineering. They can also provide advice on SYSC courses.

The Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support office can also provide assistance on registrational and related activities of your program.

 

I am struggling in one or more of my courses, what should I do?

Sometimes you may encounter difficulties in a course. When this happens try your best to first identify the cause of the problem. For assistance on course material approach your course instructor or a TA.

If your problem is not specificially about the course content, but instead more to do with your study habits then consider seeing the Student Academic Success Centre (SASC).

Check their web pages as you may find good advice or assistance there.

For registrational or schedule issues with courses see the Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support Office or the Registrar's Office.

The associate chair (undergraduate) can also provide advice on any of the above mentioned areas to a lesser or greater degree.

Most importantly, note there are many people in Carleton University who want to help you and ensure your studies are as successful as possible. It is important to seek the right advice, early on. Do not be afraid to ask for assistance.

 

ELEC Courses, General

I need a prerequisite waiver, audit permission,  lab exemption or other special consideration for registration in an ELEC course. Who do I see?

See the Associate Chair (undergraduate) for the Dept. of Electronics. Special considerations of this type in a course are at the discretion of the associate chair and the course instructor. You can obtain the Waiver of prerequisite form from the Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support web page. Please note that the default Departmental policy is that every prerequisite will be enforced, so the associate chair and course instructor are under no obligation to waive a prerequisite.

Lab exemptions are course-specific, so you should contact the course instructor.

I’m not happy with my mark in an ELEC course. What should I do?

The first thing to do is discuss the situation with the course instructor. If the instructor is comfortable with the mark you’ve been given, the next step is to submit a Review of Grade Request to the registrar’s office. There is a fee of $50 for this procedure.

 

Specific ELEC Courses

Can I do the project course ELEC 4907 or SYSC 4907 in the summer?

Projects are not offered in the summer. This is because the projects are carried out in groups, with specific deadline dates for proposals, presentations and reports. These are scheduled throughout the Fall and Winter each year, the normal period for the projects.

 

Can I do the project course ELEC 4907 or SYSC 4907 before my last year in the program, or during my co-op work term between third and fourth year?

Projects should be done in your final year. There are considered to be one of the final important pieces of work you should do in your program.

 

Can I take SYSC 3601 to satisfy the requirements of ELEC 4601?

After August 31, 2003, the courses will no longer be considered equivalent, and SYSC 3601 will not satisfy the requirement for ELEC 4601. ELEC 4601 also precludes credit for SYSC 3601, so you cannot take SYSC 3601 as an elective. If you take SYSC 3601 after August 31, 2003, it will be considered extra to the degree. Completion of SYSC 3601 prior to August 31, 2003 will satisfy the requirement for ELEC 4601.

 

What are the rules regarding eligibility for registration in ELEC 3105B and ELEC 3908B (winter sections)?

These sections are only available to co-op students. Information on the registration procedure may be available on the news page, usually at the end of the Fall term.

 

What are the rules regarding eligibility for registration in summer sections of ELEC 3509 and ELEC 3909?

These sections are specifically for the co-op program, but a limited number of spaces may be available for non-co-op students. Check the news page, usually towards the end of the Winter term, for specific information and the procedure for registration.

 

I’m a Communications Engineering student, and I’m required to take ELEC 3909, but the prerequisite, ELEC 3105, is not part of my program. What should I do?

Communications engineering are permitted to take ELEC 3909 without the ELEC 3105 prerequisite.

 

I’d like to take ELEC 3500 in the fall (winter) instead of the winter (fall), but I can’t register for the other section. Why is this and how can I get registered in the other section?

Registration in the fall section of ELEC 3500 is limited to Computer Systems students. The winter sections are limited to EE students. In order to balance enrollment, registration in the term opposite to that reserved for your program is not possible (including third year EE co-ops who would like to take ELEC 3500 in the fall). You can fill out the online Registration Overide request on Carleton Central. if you wish, but the chances of success are negligible.

 

Non-ELEC Courses

I need a prerequisite waiver, audit permission,  lab exemption or other special consideration for registration in a non-ELEC (including ECOR) course. Who do I see?

For any special considerations in a non-ELEC course, contact the course instructor who will tell you the policy of the department offering the course. In some situations you may deal with the course instructor directly, in others you may deal with someone else in the department. The same applies to ECOR courses (you can find an ECOR course instructor’s department by searching the Engineering departmental websites for the course instructor or by contacting the departments directly).

 

I have a problem with a non-ELEC (including ECOR) course. Who do I contact?

Courses are the responsibility of the course instructor’s department. If you have a problem with a non-ELEC course, contact the course instructor and/or the Associate Chair (Undergraduate) of the course instructor’s department. The same applies to ECOR courses (you can find an ECOR course instructor’s department by searching the Engineering departmental websites for the course instructor or by contacting the departments directly).

 

Prerequisites

What is a “year status” prerequisite?

Year status is a designation based on the courses you have completed from each year of the program. The requirements are described in the academic regulations and requirements for the Bachelor of Engineering Degree in the Undergraduate Calendar. Note: that status is not the same as standing. Status is used in Engineering, whereas standing is used in the rest of the University. Status is not reported on your audit but it is clearly defined in the link above.

 

Do I have to complete all the courses from second year to proceed to third year, and all the courses from third year to proceed to fourth year?

No, but some third and fourth year courses have a year status prerequisite.

 

What is a prerequisite tree and where can I get one?

A prerequisite tree depicts the prerequisite requirements of all required courses in the program using something like a flow chart. It also shows the term in which each course is taken in the standard program progression. It captures a large amount of information in a concise way and is an invaluable aid if you are taking courses out of the normal pattern. They are available from Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support .

 

What is a prerequisite waiver?

A prerequisite waiver is a form that gives you permission to be exempted from the prerequisite condition, in other words for the prerequisite condition to be waived.

 

How do I obtain a prerequisite waiver for an ELEC course?

Apply using the form available from Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support and see the associate chair with the completed form. Note, you very likely will be sent to see the intructor of the course you are seeking the waiver for.

 

How do I obtain a prerequisite waiver for a non-ELEC course?

For any special considerations in a non-ELEC course, contact the course instructor who will tell you the policy of the department offering the course. In some situations you may deal with the course instructor directly, in others you may deal with someone else in the department. The same applies to ECOR courses (you can find an ECOR course instructor’s department by searching the Engineering departmental websites for the course instructor or by contacting the departments directly).

 

I don’t have the required fourth year status in Engineering prerequisite, can I still do ELEC 4907 or SYSC 4907 (the fourth year project course)?

If you do not have fourth year status in Engineering, often the result of failing/postponing SYSC 2002 and/or SYSC 2004, you will not have the project course prerequisite and are therefore not eligible for the fourth year project. However, you may be considered for a prerequisite waiver subject to the following conditions:

  • You will normally only be considered if you could complete the degree requirements in the year in which you wish to register in the project. In other words, you must be attempting to do the project in the last full academic year of your program.
  • If you are intending to take an overload in order to complete the program and require permission to take the overload, this permission depends on your performance in the program. If you are not permitted to take an overload in the last year, your studies would continue for another year and you would therefore have to postpone the project until then.
  • In addition to the previous considerations, a prerequisite waiver is subject to the enrollment level in the project course. If the registration of eligible students exceeds the Department’s capacity, waivers will not be given.

If you do not have the prerequisite for the fourth year project but wish to be considered for enrollment, submit a request for a prerequisite waiver to the Associate Chair, who will evaluate your request.

 

Complementary Studies Electives (CSEs) and EE Science Electives

What is the difference between a “Basic Science Elective” a “Science Elective for Engineering ” and a “Complementary Studies Elective” (CSE)?

A Complementary Studies Elective (CSE) is a course from a discipline outside science and engineering. Accreditation of the EE and EngPhys degrees towards the requirements of professional engineer status requires inclusion of a certain number of credits of CSE courses (2.0 for the EE degree, 1.5 for EngPhys) to provide breadth within the degree. A list of eligible electives is provided before the start of each term and is available on the Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support web site. In the EE program, a 0.5 credit basic science course should be taken in either fall or winter of the second year. A list of eligible courses is also available on the Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support web site. The science or engineering elective in 4th year may be one of the courses indicated in the note on the prerequisite tree, or a science elective for engineering as described in the Engineering program description in the Undergraduate Calendar. Note that the EE degree program requirements do not say you have to take a Science Elective in 4th year, just that you may take it as one of the choices for the 0.5 credit requirement. Also note that the Science Electives do not apply to the EngPhys program, since there is no requirement in fourth year that can be satisfied by a course from the Science Electives list, as there is in the EE program.

 

Can I take a different course for a CSE than is on the calendar list?

In order to request permission to have a course other than those on the list count as a CSE, submit an Alternate Complementary Studies Elective Request form from Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support. Only courses which are clearly humanities and social science, and which do not predominantly involve the acquisition of language skills are candidates for consideration. Do not take a course which is not an allowed CSE then apply for CSE credit. Apply for the credit before you take the course, or you risk losing credit for the course. Also note that this approval process can take months, so you should apply far ahead of time. The rate of success for these requests is low, because most of the allowable courses have already been anticipated in the calendar list.

 

I’ve taken a course which is not on the approved CSE list. What will happen to this course?

If you take a course which is not on the approved CSE list you can apply for the course to be approved as a CSE, but the chances of success are low. If credit is not granted, the course will become extra to the degree.

 

Many of the approved CSE and science elective courses require prerequisites, and in some cases it would be difficult or impossible to take all the prerequisites. Is the implication that prerequisites in an approved elective course are waived for engineering students?

The lists of allowed elective courses reflect the accreditation rules of the Professional Engineers of Ontario. There is no implication that prerequisites will be waived for engineering students.

 

Can I take an ITV section of a course for my CSE?

No, the Engineering Program Requirements section of the calendar clearly states that ITV sections are not acceptable.

 

When I took SOME COURSE as a CSE or science elective it was on the list of allowed electives, but now it is no longer on the list. Does that mean I’ve lost credit for the elective?

If the elective you took was allowed in the year in which you took it, you will retain credit.

 

Can I take a CSE or science elective now that was allowed when I started but is no longer on the list?

Because it is an accreditation issue with the Professional Engineers of Ontario, once the list of allowed electives changes, the new list is in effect immediately and previous lists no longer apply.

 

Deferred Exams

How do I apply for a deferred exam, and what supporting documentation is required?

This is explained in academic regulation 2.5 in the Undergraduate Calendar. Application is made through the Registrar's office, which also provides a link to the Carleton medical form which you may want to give to your doctor.

 

I missed my deferred exam. Can I get a deferred deferred?

No and the explanation is within academic regulation 2.5 referenced in the previous question. The Registrar's Office has information in their deferrals webpage.

 

Registration, Deregistration

How can I register in an ELEC undergraduate course as a “special student” (i.e. a student not enrolled in a degree program)?

Special students are not normally permitted to take engineering courses. Contact Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support. if you believe you have good reason to be allowed on an engineering course.

 

I’m a student from the University of Ottawa, and I’ve received permission from the UofO  to take a Carleton ELEC course as part of my program. What do I do?

Bring your signed permission form from the UofO and a list of your current marks to the Electronics office and ask for it to be forwarded to the Associate Chair. The decision as to your eligibility for the course will be made on the basis of your marks overall as well as your preparedness for the course in terms of prerequisites. Please note that UofO students can only be accommodated in a CU ELEC course when the course enrollment is below capacity. If the course is full, UofO students cannot be accommodated. The final enrollment situation is sometimes not known until the last day for registration (e.g. if there are people waiting to get in), so it may not be until then that you know for sure whether you will be registered. In general, if the course is full and people are waiting, it is very unlikely that the number will drop below the limit, so it is unlikely you’ll be accommodated.

 

I tried to register for an ELEC course and the system tells me it is full. What should I do?

Use the online Registration Overide request on Carleton Central. You will be contacted with the result of your petition.

 

I get the message RESERVE CLOSED  when I try to register for a course. What does this mean?

In order to balance enrollment, individual sections of a course can be reserved for students in certain programs. This message usually means that you are not eligible to register in that section because no spots are available in that section for students in your program. You may use the online Registration Overide request on Carleton Central however the course capacity may be limited by lecture hall or laboratory size, and additional space cannot be made available.

 

Why have I been deregistered from an ELEC course?

There are a number of possible reasons why you may have been deregistered from a course, many of which are discussed in regulation 1.5 of the calendar. For fee issues you should contact the Business Office. Deregistration for lack of prerequisite is at the discretion of the course instructor, and you should contact him or her regarding a prerequisite waiver (see also the associated FAQ question on prerequisite waivers). In addition to those reasons, it is from time to time necessary to reduce enrollment in a course by postponing the registration of students who could take it in a later year. In this case, students who could take the course in a later year without a great penalty will be deregistered from the course in the current year (even if they satisfy the prerequisite).

 

How can I appeal deregistration from a course?

If the deregistration was due to lacking the prerequisite, there is no appeal possible. The university is fully justified in deregistering any student who does not have the required prerequisite. To appeal deregistration based on other grounds (i.e. if you have the prerequisite but were deregistered), make a submission to the Committee on Admissions and Studies (CAS).

 

How do I go about getting a letter confirming my status as a student at Carleton (possibly for RESP purposes)?

Please see the registrar’s office. Neither the department nor the Associate Dean’s office can generate such a letter.

 

I’m a student from another university, and I’d like to take summer courses at Carleton while I’m in Ottawa for the summer. How do I go about doing that?

These are done by a case by case basis so it is recommended you contact Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support , who can then provide advice.

 

I’m thinking about changing to part time status, what are the issues involved and where do I get information?

Full vs. part time status is determined automatically by the number of courses in which you register. There is an impact on your fees, which you can determine through the finance webpage. There may also be an impact on your OSAP status, which you have to check with OSAP. In terms of the engineering program, the main issue is that a change in program requirements can make a course taken in the distant past no longer eligible as a prerequisite for current courses. There may also be issues regarding transfer between programs if courses change. The time limit for completion of the program is still 8 years, regardless of your status during those 8 years.

 

Program Transfer

Is there any information available about the issues involved in transferring to EE?

The EE undergraduate website contains a link to information about requirements and course issues.

 

How do I apply to transfer to EE from another program?

See this page on the Engineering Academic Support website which gives relevant information.

 

How do I know if my application has been approved?

You will be contacted by the Engineering Academic Support office.

 

Schedules, Overloads and Graduation

How do I know which courses I’m eligible to take next year, and how do I decide which ones to take?

Eligibility for courses depends on prerequisites. To determine the courses you are eligible to take, use the program description available in the calendar to determine the next courses you are required to take, then use the individual course descriptions in the calendar to determine those for which you have the prerequisite(s). In general you should put the highest priority on the earliest courses you are missing. The Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support web page contains prerequisite trees that are of great help in determining eligibility.

 

I need help figuring out which courses I can take this year and putting together a timetable, who do I see?

In general students are expected to construct their own timetables. There are several resources which can greatly assist in this process including the prerequisite trees, the Faculty's scheduling tool, and Carleton Central. Prerequisite trees are available through Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support while the scheduling tool can be found at this link. If you have tried these and find you are still requiring advice you can contact the Department's Associate Chair.

 

I need permission to take an overload this year. Who do I contact?

See the policy on overloading under section 6.4 of the academic regulations in the current Undergraduate Calendar.

If you have a CGPA of 7.00, and have completed a minimum of 4.0 credits at Carleton, then registration of a 0.5 credit overload should be automatically possible.  Should your situation be different then you will need to fill in a course overload request form from Engineering Undergraduate Academic Support and submit it to the associate chair for undergraduate studies.  Your request will then be carefully considered.

 

How can I tell what my remaining requirements are for graduation?

The Associate Dean’s office can assist with determining your graduation requirements.

 

Degree Audit, CGPA, Academic Performance Evaluation, Academic Warning and Suspension

I have found an error on my DARS audit. How do I report it?

Use this form to report an error on your audit. You should also check the news page for any information about DARS audits.

 

How is my CGPA (cumulative grade point average) calculated?

Section 6.1 of the calendar discusses the calculation of the CGPA, and the “Academic Regulations for the Bachelor of Engineering Degrees” section discusses Engineering-specific issues. Note that:

  • The Engineering program itself is considered to be your “major”, so the CGPA of all courses in your program is your major CGPA for the purposes of academic evaluation.
  • “F” grades received prior to August 31, 2002 are not included in your CGPA calculation (but must still be cleared, i.e. the course repeated and passed, before graduation). “F” grades received after August 31, 2002 are included in the CGPA calculation. In both cases, once you repeat the course and received a passing grade, the new passing grade replaces the “F” and your CGPA is recalculated.
  • If you repeat a course you’ve already passed, the new grade replaces the old one and the CGPA is updated, even if the newer mark is lower than the old. If you repeat a course and fail it, the “F” replaces the old grade and is included in the CGPA calculation until you clear the “F” by repeating the course once again. Each replacement counts as a discredit (see section 6.3 of the undergraduate calendar).
  • If you have more eligible courses than are required for the complementary studies, science or engineering elective requirements of the degree, the courses with the best marks are used to satisfy the requirement, and the other courses are considered “extra to the degree”, and are not included in the CGPA calculation. However, note that replacement of a course counts as a discredit (see section 6.3 of the undergraduate calendar).

 

If I repeat a course, does the old grade count in my CGPA?

No, see How is my CGPA is calculated for more information.

 

If I repeat a course, does the old grade still show up on my transcript?

Yes, your transcript shows your academic record at Carleton, so all grades you receive in a course will appear on the transcript.

 

What is the “Academic Performance Evaluation” and when is it done?

Section 7 of the undergraduate calendar discusses the academic performance evaluation and the “Academic Regulations for the Bachelor of Engineering Degrees” section discusses Engineering-specific issues. Basically, as described in section 7.1, your CGPA is calculated at the end of the first Winter term after you have attempted 4.0 credits, then compared to the requirements in Table 1 of Section 7.4. The same check is then done at the end of each subsequent winter term after you have attempted 4.0 more credits (note: all courses attempted, even ones not part of the engineering program, count towards the 4.0 credits of attempts, whereas only those eligible for credit in the Engineering program are included in the CGPA). The academic performance evaluation is a check of your marks to see whether your CGPA meets minimum standards defined in the calendar.

 

What are the possible results of the evaluation?

As described in academic regulation 7.1 in the Undergraduate Calendar, there are a number of possible outcomes of the evaluation. Please read that section of the calendar carefully. You should be targetting for a “Good Standing” evaluation. If you do not receive that then please read the description of your evaluation carefully.

 

How will I know the result of the academic performance evaluation?

You will be informed in writing by the University of the result of every academic evaluation.

 

I’ve been told I’m on “Academic Warning”, what does that mean?

The consequences of academic warning are described in Section 7.1 of the calendar. When you are put on academic warning, the result of your next academic performance evaluation must be “Good Standing” or your status will change to “Suspended”. In other words, once you are put on academic warning, you must do well enough in the next 4.0 credits of coursework to raise your CGPA to the level required in Table 1 (and note that while only Engineering program courses are counted in the CGPA, all courses taken count in the 4.0 credits, so taking courses outside the Engineering program wastes some of the 4.0 credits you have in which to get back to satisfactory performance). The farther along you are in the program, the more difficult it is to get back to satisfactory performance (because there are more courses dragging the CGPA down, and only 4.0 available to raise it).

 

I’ve been told I’m “suspended”, what does that mean and how do I correct it?

As described in academic regulation 7.1 and in the section describing academic regulations and requirements for the Bachelor of Engineering Degree in the Undergraduate Calendar a student suspended from an Engineering program is Ineligible To Return (ITR), in other words has no opportunity to return to any Engineering program thereafter. If you have been suspended and feel that you should be given another chance due to extenuating circumstances, you should file a request for special consideration with the Registrar's office.

 

Committee on Admissions and Studies (CAS)

What is the Committee on Admissions and Studies?

The Committee on Admissions and Studies is the engineering committee to which appeals are made regarding special academic circumstances. It is composed of members from all the engineering departments in the Faculty of Engineering and Design.

 

What appeals should (and should not)  be submitted to the CAS?

CAS appeals are generally for consideration in a situation where external factors have caused your academic performance to suffer, or where you feel that application of an academic rule is causing you to be treated harshly. Retroactive withdrawal from courses for a term in which you had documented major medical problems, a “Did Not Complete” grade for a course in which you missed the deferred exam due to documented illness, and a request to be reinstated after being declared Ineligible to Return are examples of CAS appeals.

Some decisions, however, are made on the authority of the Department only:

  • Program transfer decisions may not be appealed to CAS
  • Course prerequisite decisions may not be appealed to CAS

If you have any doubt as to whether you should appeal to CAS regarding an issue, contact the Associate Chair.

 

What should I include in my appeal?

Every appeal should include clear statements of the problem and the consideration that is being requested. Include all information that is relevant to your appeal.

Medical documents must specify the date of the onset of the illness, the date for recovery and the degree of incapacitation. You may find the Carleton University medical certificate useful.

Supporting letters are only useful in so far as they are relevant to your request and are written by someone who could reasonably be expected to have knowledge on which to base their support.

 

How do I submit an  appeal to the Committee on Admissions and Studies?

To submit an appeal to the committee, contact the Associate Dean’s office.

 

How will I be informed of the result of a CAS appeal?

The Associate Dean’s office will inform you of the result of a CAS appeal, usually by mail.

 

Course Credit Transfer and Advanced Standing

How do I request advanced standing in a Carleton course as part of my admission?

If you have completed courses at another institution (usually a university) which you believe are similar to courses required in your Carleton program, you must make a request for advanced standing at the time of admission. Using the form available from the admissions office, you list the Carleton course(s) for which you are requesting advanced standing, and the course(s) you’ve completed elsewhere which you believe to cover the same material. There are some important points to know about advanced standing:

  • Advanced standing is only approved when there is clear evidence for doing so. If there is any doubt, advanced standing will not be granted. You are responsible for providing sufficient information to allow the decision to be made, so the more information you provide, the better the chances of success. This issue becomes more important the less well known your former university is to Carleton. Students with degrees from another country, or from a lesser-known North American university, may be expected to provide examples of marked assignments, labs and quizzes, and sample final exams in order to make the case for advanced standing. If marked material and exams are required and you no longer have the necessary material (as is often the case), then advanced standing will not be granted.
  • Your academic performance in the previous program as well as in the particular courses you’ve listed as the basis for advanced standing will be taken into account in the decision.
  • Because the differences between programs tend to increase in later years, the likelihood of advanced standing in higher year courses is lower.

 

How does an advanced standing course contribute to the CGPA?

A course for which you have advanced standing does not enter into the calculation of your grade point average.

 

How many course credits can I transfer to Carleton?

Transfer of more than one year’s worth of credits is unlikely, given the differences between programs at different Universities. To comply with professional accreditation regulations, the most advanced standing can possibly be granted is a half the program credits, approximately 20 courses. Thus, even if you have completed three years of an EE program elsewhere, and you manage to receive two full years worth of credits, you will have to take two more years worth of courses at Carleton. For that reason, once you reach the halfway point in a program somewhere else, it is almost always better to finish the program there rather than transfer to Carleton.

 

I’d like some idea of whether I will get advanced standing before going to all the effort of applying. Can I do that?

The admissions office maintains a list of known course equivalences for some colleges and universities, and may be able to tell you right away if advanced standing is possible. There is no mechanism for a “quick check” or pre-approval of other courses, you will have to go through the formal advanced standing request procedure as part of the application process.

 

Why was my request for advanced standing turned down?

Use the Transfer Credit Request Form available from the faculty academic support web page. However, note that the highest priority for evaluation of advanced standing requests is given to those made at the time of admission. Thus, to maximize the chance of your request being considered, you should make one request for all advanced standing at the time of admission. If you apply for more advanced standing later in the program, there is no guarantee that the request can be evaluated.

 

I’d like to take a course (science, engineering or CSE) at another university  and have it count towards my degree. What should I do?

A course taken at another university will be counted towards your degree if and only if you are granted advanced standing in that course. Rather than take the course then apply for advanced standing, you should try to establish equivalency between the courses beforehand. This prevents taking the course and not getting advanced standing. Since a request for advanced standing is evaluated by the department offering the course at Carleton, you should contact the Carleton department offering the course you are targeting and ask them what would be required to establish equivalency of the two courses. The department may or may not offer this service.

For ELEC courses, you are responsible for identifying a course that you think is equivalent to one at Carleton and assembling sufficient information to allow the comparison to be made (which would include the course outline as well as assignments, labs and sample exams – obviously this material will have to be acquired from the other university). When you have assembled this information, forward it to the Associate Chair (undergrad) along with your request. The more information you provide, the better the chances of success. Note that, because the treatment of material is different between universities, equivalence is more difficult to find for courses later in the program. It will be very difficult to find an equivalence for a 4000 level course.

If you are successful in establishing equivalence between courses with the intention of using the course as a CSE, obviously the course at Carleton must be on the list of allowed CSEs for engineering.

 

What are the rules regarding transfer between EE or EngPhys and other programs (i.e. into or out of EE/EngPhys), and how do I go about applying?

This document describes the academic and program issues involved in transferring into the EE program. The decision will be made on the basis of available spots in the program and your performance in all courses to date. Although each request is handled on a case-by-case basis, the ever-increasing demand for these programs means that a CGPA of at least 8 for all courses taken so far is likely to be the minimum requirement for transfer, but still no guarantee. Transferring programs may also delay completion of the degree, because you will have to make up certain courses. The later in the program you transfer, the greater the number of courses that need to be made up, and the less likely it is that you will be able to finish in four years.

Transfer into the EngPhys program is very difficult due to the very small number of available spots. Contact the Associate Chair for more information.

To apply for transfer to the EE or EngPhys programs, fill out a Change of Major form and submit it to the registrar’s office.

To transfer from EE or EngPhys to another program, contact the Associate Chair (undergraduate) for the department offering the program to which you wish to transfer.

 

Calendar

What is the official version of the Calendar?

The online version of the calendar is the official version.

 

I’ve noticed a discrepancy between the online and printed versions of the calendar. Who should I report this to?

Since the online version of the calendar is the official version, problems in the printed version are not reported or tracked.

 

Associate Chair (Undergraduate)

How do I know when your office hours are?

The Associate Chair (Undergraduate) link contains information about my office hours.

 

I can’t attend your office hour, or I’d prefer to meet you in person. Can I schedule an appointment with you?

Yes, please e-mail me.

 

I’ve emailed you and you haven’t responded. Why not?

Most people who use email regularly now receive dozens of spam emails a day, and it is possible that your email has been filtered or otherwise lost, perhaps inadvertently deleted. One thing you can do to maximize the chances of your email getting through is to avoid subject lines like “Help Me” or “ru there?????”. Use a subject line that contains something specific to your request such as “CU Student 100123456: Why was I deregistered from ELEC 3105?”.

Alway use your MyCarleton Connect e-mail account when corresponding to faculty or staff at the University. This is because your Connect e-mail address gives us a level of assurance that the e-mail is actually from you. If you send using another e-mail account expect a reply asking for you to resend via your Connect account, or only information that contains nothing specific to you. Please read regulation 3.5 concerning electronic communication in the Undergraduate Calendar. Note, you should be able to have your MyCarleton direct to another of your e-mail accounts, should you want. Please check your Connect account regularly, ideally daily.

I can receive a lot of genuine e-mail in a day and have other commitments which can delay the reading of those e-mails. So, delays of a day or two are possible, particularly around times of peak demand, for example a registration time. A longer delay than that may indicate that your email did not make it through, and you should resend it.

Search Carleton